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Wednesday, January 11

  1. page home edited Anxiety Anxiety &General Anxiety Disorders {social-anxiety-google.jpg} {social-anxiety…

    Anxiety
    Anxiety &General Anxiety Disorders
    {social-anxiety-google.jpg}
    {social-anxiety-google.jpg}
    (Picture Retrieved From:http://cherished79.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/social-anxiety-google.jpg)
    "A state of apprehension, uncertainty, and fear resulting from the anticipation of a realistic or fantasized threatening event or situation, often impairing physical and psychological functioning." Retrieved from: http://www.yourdictionary.com/anxiety (2010)
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    12:50 pm

Sunday, August 15

  1. page Causes and Recovery From Anxiety Disorders edited ... Anxiety disorders develop from a complex interplay of genetic, biological, cognitive, developm…
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    Anxiety disorders develop from a complex interplay of genetic, biological, cognitive, developmental and other factors, such as personal, socio-economic and workplace stress. A variety of theories has been proposed to explain how these factors contribute to the development of anxiety disorders.
    The first is experiential: people may learn their fear from an initial experience, such as an embarrassing situation, physical or sexual abuse, or the witnessing of a violent act. Similar subsequent experiences serve to reinforce the fear. A second theory relates to cognition or thinking, in that people believe or predict that the result of a specific situation will be embarrassing or harmful. This may occur, for example, if parents are over-protective and continually warn against potential problems. A third theory focuses on a biological basis. Research suggests that the amygdala, a structure deep within the brain, serves as a communication hub that signals the presence of a threat and triggers a fear response or anxiety. It also stores emotional memories, and may play a role in the development of anxiety disorders. The children of adults with anxiety disorders are at much greater risk of an anxiety disorder than the general population, suggesting that genetics may play a role as well. Numerous studies have also confirmed that neurotransmitters in the brain, such as serotonin, norepinephrine, as well as hormonal factors influence the onset and course of anxiety disorders.
    {butterfly.webarchive}
    Recovery from Anxiety Disorders
    Early recognition and appropriate management are imperative to the enhancement of the quality of life of individuals with anxiety disorders. Proper recognition and management also help to prevent common secondary disorders, such as depression and problematic substance use. Several factors, such as stigma, lack of knowledge or personal financial resources, or lack of available health professionals, may discourage people from seeking help for anxiety disorders. In addition, family physicians may not always recognize the pattern in an individual's symptoms that would lead to a correct diagnosis. Too often, symptoms are not taken seriously and an individual with an anxiety disorder is labelled as being emotionally unstable. Education of both the public and family physicians would help to solve this problem.
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    7:15 pm
  2. page Causes and Recovery From Anxiety Disorders edited ... Anxiety disorders develop from a complex interplay of genetic, biological, cognitive, developm…
    ...
    Anxiety disorders develop from a complex interplay of genetic, biological, cognitive, developmental and other factors, such as personal, socio-economic and workplace stress. A variety of theories has been proposed to explain how these factors contribute to the development of anxiety disorders.
    The first is experiential: people may learn their fear from an initial experience, such as an embarrassing situation, physical or sexual abuse, or the witnessing of a violent act. Similar subsequent experiences serve to reinforce the fear. A second theory relates to cognition or thinking, in that people believe or predict that the result of a specific situation will be embarrassing or harmful. This may occur, for example, if parents are over-protective and continually warn against potential problems. A third theory focuses on a biological basis. Research suggests that the amygdala, a structure deep within the brain, serves as a communication hub that signals the presence of a threat and triggers a fear response or anxiety. It also stores emotional memories, and may play a role in the development of anxiety disorders. The children of adults with anxiety disorders are at much greater risk of an anxiety disorder than the general population, suggesting that genetics may play a role as well. Numerous studies have also confirmed that neurotransmitters in the brain, such as serotonin, norepinephrine, as well as hormonal factors influence the onset and course of anxiety disorders.
    {butterfly.webarchive}
    Recovery from Anxiety Disorders
    Early recognition and appropriate management are imperative to the enhancement of the quality of life of individuals with anxiety disorders. Proper recognition and management also help to prevent common secondary disorders, such as depression and problematic substance use. Several factors, such as stigma, lack of knowledge or personal financial resources, or lack of available health professionals, may discourage people from seeking help for anxiety disorders. In addition, family physicians may not always recognize the pattern in an individual's symptoms that would lead to a correct diagnosis. Too often, symptoms are not taken seriously and an individual with an anxiety disorder is labelled as being emotionally unstable. Education of both the public and family physicians would help to solve this problem.
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    7:13 pm
  3. page Personal Story of Anxiety edited My Personal Story, A Story of Struggle, and Success. ... I ate. Sometimes I had to force mysel…
    My Personal Story,
    A Story of Struggle, and Success.
    ...
    I ate. Sometimes I had to force myself to eat. I made
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    your children". I dont really remember if it was those words excactly, but it was pretty darn close. I took the message for what it was. At that
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    children and that I wasn't
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    who read mythis story and
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    the best medication.medication of all. He prescribed
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    with a scarynatural dose of
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    anything from thismy experience with anxiety, it is
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    gain from anxiety,anxiety and stress, but I
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    lot to loose.lose. I refuse to looselet anxiet and stress take over my life and cause me lose the two
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    in my life andlife, those two people arebeing my children. All of my family are important to me, but myMy children are my angels. Myangels, my saving gracegrace, and my faith.
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    7:09 pm
  4. page References edited ... DOI: 10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.3082 The Human Face of Mental Illness in Canada-2006 Pu…
    ...
    DOI: 10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.3082
    The Human Face of Mental Illness in Canada-2006 Public Health Agency of Canada Retrieved July 20, 2010 from
    http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/human-humain06/pdf/human_face_e.pdfhttp://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/miic-mmac/chap_4-eng.php
    Mental Health Promotion Video (2008) http://www.youtube.com/user/SpikedMarkus#p/a
    Psychiatryonline (2010) Specific Phobias. Diagnostic Criteria for 300.29 Specific Phobias. Retrieved July 4, 2010 from
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    4:42 pm
  5. page References edited ... Psychiatryonline (2010). Panic Attack. Diagnostic criteria for Panic Attack. Retrieved July 4,…
    ...
    Psychiatryonline (2010). Panic Attack. Diagnostic criteria for Panic Attack. Retrieved July 4, 2010 from
    DOI: 10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.3082
    http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/human-humain06/pdf/human_face_e.pdfThe Human Face of Mental Illness in Canada-2006 Public Health Agency of Canada Retrieved July 20, 2010 from
    http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/human-humain06/pdf/human_face_e.pdf
    Mental Health Promotion Video (2008) http://www.youtube.com/user/SpikedMarkus#p/a

    Psychiatryonline (2010) Specific Phobias. Diagnostic Criteria for 300.29 Specific Phobias. Retrieved July 4, 2010 from
    DOI: 10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.3222
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    4:40 pm
  6. page References edited ... Psychiatryonline (2010). Panic Attack. Diagnostic criteria for Panic Attack. Retrieved July 4,…
    ...
    Psychiatryonline (2010). Panic Attack. Diagnostic criteria for Panic Attack. Retrieved July 4, 2010 from
    DOI: 10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.3082
    http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/human-humain06/pdf/human_face_e.pdf Retrieved July 20, 2010
    Psychiatryonline (2010) Specific Phobias. Diagnostic Criteria for 300.29 Specific Phobias. Retrieved July 4, 2010 from
    DOI: 10.1176/appi.books.9780890423349.3222
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    4:27 pm
  7. page Impact of Anxiety Disorders edited ... agoraphobia: 1.0% versus 0.4%. The sample size was too small to assess the prevalence by age. …
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    agoraphobia: 1.0% versus 0.4%. The sample size was too small to assess the prevalence by age.
    Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey, 2002, Mental Health and Well-being Cycle 1.2
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    Butterfly Photo Received From: http://www.odemagazine.com/exchange/498/living_earth_television_your_neighbors_around_the_world
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    4:19 pm
  8. page Impact of Anxiety Disorders edited ... According to the 2002 Mental Health and Wellbeing Survey (CCHS 1.2), a greater proportion of w…
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    According to the 2002 Mental Health and Wellbeing Survey (CCHS 1.2), a greater proportion of women than men under the age of 65 year had symptoms that met the criteria for one of the measured anxiety disorders during the previous 12 months. (Figure 5-1) The greatest difference was among young adults (15–24 years), where young women were twice as likely as young men to have an anxiety disorder (8.9% compared to 4.3%). The gap narrowed with age because the proportion of women with an anxiety disorder decreased with age. Seniors had lower 12-month and lifetime prevalence of anxiety disorder than all younger age groups. (Figure 5-2) Approximately 1 in 8 adults in Canada aged 15–24, 25–44 and 45–64 years reportedsymptoms that met the criteria for having had one of the selected anxiety disorders during their lifetime.
    Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Community Health Survey, 2002, Mental Health and Well-being Cycle 1.2
    ...
    chart 5-1.docx} {Wiki+Chart2 new.docx}{Wiki Chart 5-2.docx}
    Women in the 15–24 and 25–44 year age groups were more likely than men to be identified as having panic disorder in the previous 12 months. (Figure 5-3) In the 45–64 year age group, the proportions among men and women were similar. Although the 12-month prevalence of panic disorder was lower in the 45–64 yearold age group, the lifetime prevalence was higher in this age group than in all other age groups. (Figure 5-4). A greater proportion of young women than young men (15–24 years) reported symptoms that met the criteria for having had social phobia during the previous 12 months. (Figure 5-5) The proportion among women decreased with age. Nearly 1 in 10 Canadians under the age of 65 years met the criteria for having had social phobia at some time in their lives. (Figure 5-6) Lifetime prevalence decreased dramatically over age 65 years. Women were twice as likely as men to report symptoms that met the criteria for
    agoraphobia: 1.0% versus 0.4%. The sample size was too small to assess the prevalence by age.
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    4:14 pm
  9. 4:14 pm

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